Fiber Infrastructure Deployment: Validate Link Budget

Prior to deploying a new fiber cabling infrastructure, or reusing the installed infrastructure, it’s vital to understand the link budget of the selected speed and transceivers in the new architecture, as well as the desired number of connections in each link.

In new fiber infrastructure deployment, more stringent link budget specifications will need higher-quality passive optical components with reduced channel insertion loss in the link. Typically, the low-loss connector not only allows more connections, but also supports longer links with solid performance.

As you get ready for new fiber infrastructure deployment, there are four essential checkpoints that you should keep in mind:

  1. Determine the active equipment I/O interface based on application types
  2. Choose optical link media based on reach and speed
  3. Verify optical fiber standards developed by standards bodies
  4. Validate optical link budget based on link distance and number of connection points

In a series of blogs, we have discussed these checkpoints. This blog covers the final checkpoint (No. 4): validating the optical link budget based on link distances and number of connection points.

Validating the Multimode Link Budget

The current available ultra-low-loss adaptor is 0.2 dB for MPO-8/12 and 0.35 dB for MPO-24 per connection. These enhancements have been achieved by a combination of new material and polishing methods.

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Budgeting Sufficient Power: Key to Future-proof Fiber Infrastructure

With the technology transformations happening in today’s enterprises, many types of organizations – from hotels and gaming facilities to schools and offices – are deploying new fiber cabling infrastructure.

However, it’s crucial to understand the power budget of the new architecture, as well as the desired number of connections in each link. The power budget indicates the amount of loss that a link (from the transmitter to the receiver) can tolerate while maintaining an acceptable level of operation.

This blog provides you with multimode fiber (MMF) link specifications so you can ensure your fiber connections have sufficient power for best performance. In an upcoming blog, we’ll cover the link specifications for singlemode fiber.

 Attenuation and Effective Modal Bandwidth

The latest IEC and ANSI/TIA standards ratified the maximum cabled fiber attenuation coefficients for OM3 and OM4 to 3.0 dB/km for cabled fiber at 850 nm. Attenuation is also known as “transmission loss,” and is the loss of optical power due to absorption, scattering, bending, etc. as light travels through the fiber. OM4 can support a longer reach than OM3, mainly due to its better light-confining characteristics, defined by its effective modal bandwidth (EMB).

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Checkpoint 3: Optical Fiber Standards for Fiber Infrastructure Deployment

To reinforce the expanding cloud ecosystem, optical active component vendors have designed and commercialized new transceiver types under multi-source agreements (MSAs) for dissimilar data center types; standards bodies are incorporating these new variants into new standards development.

For example, IEEE 802.3 taskforces are working on 50 Gbps- and 100 Gbps-per-lane technologies for next-generation Ethernet speeds from 50 Gbps to 400 Gbps. Moving from 10 Gbps to 25 Gbps, and then to 50 Gbps and 100 Gbps per lane, creates new challenges in semiconductor integrated circuit design and manufacturing processes, as well as in high-speed data transmission.

Getting ready for new fiber infrastructure deployment to accommodate these upcoming changes, there are four essential checkpoints that we think you should keep in mind:

  1. Determine the active equipment I/O interface based on application types
  2. Choose optical link media based on reach and speed
  3. Verify optical fiber standards developed by standards bodies
  4. Validate optical link budget based on link distance and number of connection points

The first blog published on March 23, 2017 – we are discussing these checkpoints, describing current technology trends and explaining the latest industry standards for data center applications. This blog covers checkpoint No. 3: verifying optical fiber standards developed by standards bodies.

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Using an Adaptor as a Single Connection – It’s Possible!

Pre-terminated solutions is an admired choice for the fixed portion of a cabling channel (reaching from the access switch patch panel to the server cabinet patch panel, for example) – and with good justification.

Pre-terminated cable makes installation swifter and easier, with a plug-and-play methodology behind it. It can be installed by a wide variety of people all with various levels of skills or experiences since field termination is not necessary; instead, terminations are completed at the factory, and then verified and validated for reliability and performance before they leave. This allows field troubleshooting and testing during installation to be kept to a minimum. Pre-terminated solutions also result in less jobsite waste material to clean up.

These pre-terminated cables can be packaged together in groups of six or eight to create an assembly that installs as one, allowing installers to pull multiple cables at one time to move project installation along faster.

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Rack Scale Design: “Data-Center-in-a-Box”

The “data-center-in-a-box” concept is becoming a reality as data center operators look for explanations that are easily replicated, scaled and deployed following a just-in-time methodology.

Rack scale design is a modular, efficient design approach that supports this yearning for easier-to-manage compute and storage solutions.

What is Rack Scale Design?

Rack scale design solutions serve as the building blocks of a new data center methodology that incorporates a software-defined, hyper-converged management system within a concentrated, single rack solution. In essence, rack scale design is a design approach that supports hyper-convergence.

Rack scale design is changing the data center environment. Read on to discover how the progress to a hyper-converged, software-defined environment came about; its pros and cons; the effects on the data center infrastructure; and where rack scale design solutions are headed.

What is Hyper-Convergence?

Two years ago, the term “hyper-convergence” meant nothing in our industry. By 2019, however, hyper-convergence is expected to be a $5 billion market.

Offering a centralized approach to organizing data center infrastructure, hyper-convergence can collapse compute, storage, virtualization and networking into one SKU, adding a software-defined layer to manage data, software and physical infrastructure. Based on software and/or appliances, or supplied with commodity-based servers, hyper-convergence places compute, storage and networking into one package or “physical container” to create a virtualized data center.

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